Boppard Abroad – at the Met Museum, New York

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has a large collection of panels from the Carmelite Church at Boppard.

The Met Museum

The Met Museum

Some of the glass is on display in the medieval gallery of the main museum on 5th Avenue, while larger windows can be seen at the Cloisters Museum which is located in Fort Tryon Park in the northern end of Manhattan Island.

The four scenes at the Met come from the same Tree of Jesse window as the panels in our collection – so my focus was on these windows. I spent two days in the conservation studio at the Met and I am very grateful to all the staff and especially Drew Anderson, the stained glass Conservator at the Met, who made it possible for me to study and photograph the stained glass in detail.

The Visitation 13.64.3a,b*

The Visitation 13.64.3a,b*

The Nativity13.64.4.a,b*

The Nativity13.64.4.a,b*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Deposition 13.64.1.a,b*

The Deposition 13.64.1.a,b*

The Entombment 13.64.2.a,b*

The Entombment 13.64.2.a,b*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*All images © Metropolitan Museum of Art     http://www.metmuseum.org

 The panels were acquired by the Met Museum in 1913 from the dealer Grosvenor Thomas (he was the father of Roy Grosvenor Thomas who helped Burrell acquire glass from the Hearst and Goelet Collections in the late 1930’s). Before that they were owned by the Duveen Brothers (art dealers based in London, Paris, New York) who in turn had bought the glass from the auction of the Friedrich Spitzer Collection in 1893.

Comparing the Met panels with the Burrell panels, I found more similarities than differences. This means that similar restorations which cannot be attributed to the Berlin workshop (or which I am hesitating to attribute to the Berlin workshop because I understand that the quality of their work was very high) must have been carried out during the time all the panels were together in the Spitzer Collection.

It may prove worthwhile and necessary to do more research on the dealer and collector of art and antiquities Friederich Spitzer (1814–1890). The Boppard stained glass was in his collection for 20 years and it is beginning to look as if some restoration work was done during that time. I also think that a research project on the Royal Institute for Glass Painting in Berlin would be a worthwhile project.

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2 responses to “Boppard Abroad – at the Met Museum, New York

  1. It was really interesting to chat with you briefly about your trip to see Boppard glass in the US last week (at the conference in Amsterdam). Have you made/thought about making a visual representation of the movement of the panels between collectors on a timeline (or has anyone else done it yet?)

    • I am not aware that anyone has done this. As I am only focusing on a few windows from Boppard, my summary will only be a partial view. It would be a good idea to do this for the whole glazing scheme at some point.

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